Category Archives: Overcriminalization

Reason 363: Because You Loose Your Parental Rights If You Don’t

There’s more than one way to skin a cat, as they say. And there’s more than one way to confiscate your children. And I’d add that not all ways are equal in terms of difficulty. Now if the state just came to your house and took your children, we all know that that would be a messy affair, especially when the ballot box still counts for a little something. Suffice it to say that doing this would make the magistrate unpopular.  And then there’s the expense. The state would have to feed and care for millions (?) of children, so they’d have to hire people to do that. So as pragmatism settles out, it has been discovered that the best way to confiscate children is through the institution. That way the state can have the children, and its cake too. And, the parents are content to have their children on the weekend, and a few weeks in the summer, and still bear the expense. And after all, at the end of the day the state gets what it wants, their minds.

Here is a great article by Matt Walsh. He looks at a hiccup that happened in the system when a mother gets the notion that her child is still her’s.

Your Parental Rights Don’t Exist When You Send Your Kid To Public School

The story is based on a child who missed more days than the state allows. (“the state ‘allows‘”. You see? That’s slave thinking.) I love the way Walsh puts it:

You see, according to the compulsory attendance policy at her kid’s public school in Georgia, the district will magnanimously allow a parent to keep their kid home from school up to five times in a year without a doctor’s note. Once they exceed that magically arbitrary fifth “unexcused” absence, every succeeding incident must be specifically prescribed by a medical professional. Even if the parent feels the child should stay home, the school will not allow it unless a doctor agrees. Otherwise, the parent could be thrown in jail, which is a totally reasonable response.

Julie’s son unfortunately made the mistake of getting sick more times than the school allows, and so a warrant was issued for his mom’s arrest.

Keep in mind, this is not a unique or uncommon situation. Julie is only the latest in a long, long, long line of parents who have been violently reminded that we live in a fascist state where liberty is, increasingly, a mere fiction.

It’s a great read. And he does a great job of pointing out the obvious problems with this insanity. But the great thing is, you don’t have to participate in it. And an even greater thing is, neither does your child. And as I’ve said before here, the fact that you still have the liberty to keep your child is nothing short of God’s providence. It’s a miracle. God does provide a way.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Bureaucracy, Government, Overcriminalization, The God/State

Reason 360: Because Of Some Of The Things In The Institution That Make You Go, Hmmm

There really are things that make you go, hmmm. This article gives an example of what I’m talking about:

School Calls Police on Girl Using 2 Dollar Bill to Buy Her Chicken Nuggets! It Gets Worse!

“I went to the lunch line and they said my 2 Dollar Bill was fake,” Danesiah told Ted Oberg Investigates. “They gave it to the police. Then they sent me to the police office. A police officer said I could be in big trouble.”

Not just big trouble. Third-degree felony trouble.

School officials called Daneisha’s grandmother, Sharon Kay Joseph.

…Then the Fort Bend ISD police investigated the 2 Dollar Bill with the vigor of an episode of Dragnet, even though at that school 82-percent of kids are poor enough to get free or reduced price lunch.

The alleged theft of $2 worth of chicken tenders led a campus officer — average salary $45,000 a year — to the convenience store that gave grandma the 2 Dollar Bill.

I personally think that this little girl, supposing that she escapes the cycle of out-of-wedlock pregnancy and poverty that the Democrat and institution foster, has learned a valuable life lesson for her future dealings with her government, especially as it concerns the IRS. But even if she doesn’t escape, she has at least learned what is in store for her in her dealings with the welfare office. And of course she has already learned what to expect from the police, and how easy it is for her to become a felon.

There is another take away from this story that ought to encourage you in deciding to keep your children at home… I mean beyond the obvious, and that is that every person in this parade of dunces is government certified. They actually had to make their way to a bank, and a none government certified person, probably a bank teller, to get to the truth. So the next time you hear the word, “certified”, think of this story. Government “Certified”, as in “certified teacher”, is a meaningless word except for those who have not figured out the wool being pulled over their eyes by the whole “certification” scheme. You are as certified to teach your children as any of these dunces.

Sadly, there is no moral to this story except one, keep your children, or grandchildren, at home, and educate them there. If you’re already on welfare, (I’m guessing that this is the case here given the story) then you have the time and resources to do it, thanks to your neighbors earning money for the government to take and give to you. And furthermore, you have the one certification that trumps all certifications given out like candy by the bureaucracy, that is that you love your children. And love covers a multitude of ignorances. Don’t ask me how I know that.

Leave a comment

Filed under Overcriminalization, Overreaction

Reason 344: Because A Child Needs Discipline, Not A Wrap Sheet

This article introduces a new concept I’ve not heard before: “overcriminalization“:

Burping in Class? You’re Under Arrest

Synopsis:

  • Boy wouldn’t quit fake burping in class
  • He was put into the hallway but still stuck his head in and burped anyway
  • Police were called
  • Boy was arrested
  • Parents sued
  • Made its way to the 10th circuit court
  • Parents lost

This is a tough one and illuminates the problems with lawlessness and lack of recourse. If you’ve ever had charge over younger people, and you’ve had to deal with one who had figured out that there was nothing you could do to force him to do what he didn’t want to do, you understand the problem. Some children figure it out, and they simply disregard authority. They know you have no recourse. Why don’t you have any recourse? Because force is outlawed.

Enforcement always involves a measure of threat, which is why we’re told that  “Ceasor bears the sword”.  But look around. What happens when a few people don’t like something? Why they burn their neighborhood down? And what does Ceasor do? Nothing. Why?  He dares not use the sword because he fears that he will incite the wrath of the barbarian even further. Now where did they get such a notion? Certainly, the institution that indoctrinated them didn’t teach them any differently.

I just saw this video the other day. I think it must be taken from a movie or television show or something. But look at the expression on the second police officer’s face when the one “get’s out of line”, by threatening the use of force:

So what is a teacher to do? His hands are tied. The institution is impotent. It has tied its own hands. The government’s hands are tied. So what is to be done? Well, for now, since you don’t want to anger the barbarian, you go for the law-abiding citizen.  You play a game of up-the-ante with “criminalization” of typical boyhood behavior on those who still have a little respect for law and order. So I guess rather than corporal punishment administered by the institution, because it wasn’t administered at home, you bring in the police force. But the little future barbarian knows that he’ll be just fine. He knows that he can do as he wishes… because he’s a kid.  And a state that can’t even stomach applying justice to a murderer on death row will never be able to stomach applying some good, old-fashion, wood-shed discipline to a youth who desperately needs it, and is begging for it.

But in your house things are different. You’re not the state, and you’re the best person to apply the rod of correction, not because you hate your child, not at all. No, it’s precisely because you love your child that you teach him that there are consequences to actions. And you do it when those consequences can be applied by loving hand with short term affects, rather than the hands of reality doing it when the consequences will linger and taint.

1 Comment

Filed under Discipline, Overcriminalization